Lifestyle Intervention Improves Health for Diabetes Patients

Lifestyle Intervention Improves Health for Diabetes Patients

Lifestyle Intervention Improves Health for Diabetes Patients

Lifestyle intervention for weight loss in obese individuals with diabetes may reduce high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels, according to a report published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

L. Maria Belalcazar, M.D., of the University of Texas in Galveston, and colleagues compared the impact of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) to diabetes, support, and education (DSE) on 1,759 obese adults with type 2 diabetes. The participants in the study were randomly assigned to either the ILI or DSE group.

The researchers found that, after one year, hs-CRP levels in the ILI group dropped by 43.6 percent from baseline, compared to a 16.7 percent drop in the DSE group. The ILI group experienced weight loss and body mass index reductions of 9 kg and 3.2 kg/m², respectively, compared to reductions of 0.8 kg and 0.3 kg/m² in the DSE group. ILI participants also showed a 19 percent improvement in fitness level and improved cholesterol levels.

"Our report supports a substantial benefit of lifestyle intervention for weight loss on the chronic inflammatory state characteristic of diabetes and highlights the contribution of improved glycemic control achieved with lifestyle changes to the reduction of elevated hs-CRP levels in obese sedentary individuals with diabetes," the authors write.Lifestyle Intervention Improves Health for Diabetes Patients

Lifestyle intervention for weight loss in obese individuals with diabetes may reduce high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels, according to a report published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

L. Maria Belalcazar, M.D., of the University of Texas in Galveston, and colleagues compared the impact of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) to diabetes, support, and education (DSE) on 1,759 obese adults with type 2 diabetes. The participants in the study were randomly assigned to either the ILI or DSE group.

The researchers found that, after one year, hs-CRP levels in the ILI group dropped by 43.6 percent from baseline, compared to a 16.7 percent drop in the DSE group. The ILI group experienced weight loss and body mass index reductions of 9 kg and 3.2 kg/m², respectively, compared to reductions of 0.8 kg and 0.3 kg/m² in the DSE group. ILI participants also showed a 19 percent improvement in fitness level and improved cholesterol levels.

"Our report supports a substantial benefit of lifestyle intervention for weight loss on the chronic inflammatory state characteristic of diabetes and highlights the contribution of improved glycemic control achieved with lifestyle changes to the reduction of elevated hs-CRP levels in obese sedentary individuals with diabetes," the authors write.

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